Tairawhiti Museum and Art Gallery
Rich in Gisborne, East Coast history
Rich in Gisborne, East Coast history Poverty Bay - taonga maori
Tairawhiti Museum and Art Gallery

Education

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Semi Permanent Exhibitions

Fine Arts

Art Lectures

Rich in Gisborne, East Coast history

Poverty Bay - taonga maori

             
    

Curatorís Floortalk
with Damian Skinner


Tairawhiti Museum and Creative Tairawhiti present this informal but informative series of lectures that bring Tairawhiti artwork, exhibitions, and collections closer to you.

Entertaining, controversial, stimulating and thought provoking, the lecture series will offer a range of interesting art topics presented by Damian Skinner. Take a tour with Damian and enjoy some of the highlights from Tairawhiti Museumís art collection and exhibitions.

Skinner is a highly regarded art historian and curator based in Gisborne. He has curated exhibitions for museums and galleries throughout New Zealand and published widely on the history of New Zealand art. His most recent book is ĎThe Carver and the Artistí, a history of Maori art in the 20th century.

Damian will be joined by a panel of local artists who will comment about the artworks on show. Itís guaranteed to be lively, surprising and maybe even a bit challenging; a perfect match to the art. Come along and contribute to the discussion.

The Damian Skinner Lecture Series:
Led by Dr Damian Skinner, each session features a panel of local and imported experts who will nut out the complex, controversial and critical issues for contemporary art.

We want to see more art in our local environment; we want to promote what is unique about Tairawhiti through the arts; and discussion is as good a place as any to start the ball rolling.
This series is about many things: Itís about growing the audience for art; itís about the opportunity to meet others in the community with similar interests; itís about developing
visual literacy, learning another language - the visual language; and quite simply, itís both motivational and inspirational. The Skinner Lecture series is great value entertainment, with the power to lift your mood from weary to warm. So what are you waiting for?

Winter Series 2009

with Damian Skinner

The Friends of the Tairawhiti Museum are following up the very successful series of events held last year with a new programme of talks over the winter months of 2009. Join us for your opportunity to get up close with the treasures of the Tairawhiti Museum, and to learn more about the wide world of art and culture that your local museum represents.

Over the coming months you will have the opportunity to tour the museumís changing series of exhibitions, and hear a wide range of local and visiting speakers. From the value of bad art, to the challenges of teaching art, from the many forms of contemporary Pacific art, to the role of ornament in local architecture, the Winter Series 2009 is guaranteed to generate just the right amount of cultural heat and light to keep you warm as the days grow colder and shorter.

 

 

 

Fancy facades: an ornamental history of Gisborne buildings
5.30pm, Wednesday 12 August

An architectural historian invites you to look again at Gisborne buildings.

 

Our Winter Series continues with an illustrated lecture by architectural historian Jeremy Salmond related to the museumís new exhibition

 

Ornament: The Art of Pleasure

. Join architectural historian and practicing architect Jeremy Salmond, who will speak about the role of ornament in Gisborneís heritage buildings. From the ornate street frontages of Victorian public and commercial buildings, to the lighter and more spacious, adventurous and imaginative facades of Edwardian architecture, Gisborneís city centre is a record of ornamentís important role in buildings of the past.

 

 



Cost: Free to members of Creative Tairawhiti and Friends of the Museum, or $5 per talk for the general public. Gold coin admission for Students/Pace. Bookings are essential, call the museum, or email: lrattray@tairawhitimuseum.org.nz

Museum Directorís Comment

Nationally renowned art historian Dr Damian Skinner has conceived and hosted two series of lectures at Tairawhiti Museum in recent months. The lectures were funded by Creative Tairawhiti and the Friends of Tairawhiti Museum and hosted by Tairawhiti Museum. Audiences have responded enthusiastically to Damianís scholarly introductions to a wide range of topics and his enthusiasm for engendering discussion and debate about the history and politics of art. Guest speakers, some from beyond Tairawhiti, have contributed their perspectives as artists, curators and arts administrators. There can be no doubt that Dr Skinnerís lecture series have stimulated public interest in the museumís art collection and in a range of contemporary art issues.

That the museum has an art collection that can form the basis of such a series of lectures is a testimony to the foresight of those friends of the museum who have gifted art works to the collection since its establishment in the 1950s. It is important that the museum continues to collect and make accessible art works created by Tairawhiti artists.
Damian Skinner has acknowledged the significance of the museumís art collection by including a number of these art works, both historical and contemporary, in the Tairawhiti history exhibition he is currently curating for the museum.

David Butts

Go to previous lectures...click here.....

Creative Tairawhiti are delighted to be partnering with the Tairawhiti Museum to present the Damian Skinner Lecture Series. The public are encouraged to come along to these talks and take advantage of some brilliant art resources. More information at
www.skinnerlectures.tairawhitiarts.net .

Andy Warhol has enjoyed a lot more than 15 minutes of fame. It has to be because he was an absolute genius at thinking and communicating in the language of art - his ideas still resonate today. I hope to see some new faces at these lectures, in what is a most enjoyable and rewarding partnership with the Tairawhiti Museum. Thank you to everyone involved, and especially to our audience, who havenít been afraid to speak their minds!

Tania Short
Creative Tairawhiti

This series is funded with the support of Regional Strengths Maurangi Toi & CLANZ.

        

Inside the Art Collection
with Damian Skinner


The Damian Skinner Lecture Series:
Led by Dr Damian Skinner, each session features a panel of local and imported experts who will nut out the complex, controversial and critical issues for contemporary art.


We want to see more art in our local environment; we want to promote what is unique about Tairawhiti through the arts; and discussion is as good a place as any to start the ball rolling.
This series is about many things: Itís about growing the audience for art; itís about the opportunity to meet others in the community with similar interests; itís about developing
visual literacy, learning another language - the visual language; and quite simply, itís both motivational and inspirational. The Skinner Lecture series is great value entertainment, with the power to lift your mood from weary to warm. So what are you waiting for?

Watersheds forms a river that flows through the history of our region. Beginning with M‚ori accounts of how the world began and where people came from, this river of Tair‚whiti history finishes in the ocean of the present, next to the bustling city of Gisborne, TŻranganui-a-Kiwa. In each of these watersheds, M‚ori and later P‚keh‚ settlers have occupied the river valleys and coastal plains, naming the landscape, creating settlements and making a living from the land and the sea.

What: Digging up the past: archaeology and history

When: 1.30pm, Saturday 11 July 2009

Where: Tair‚whiti Museum

In our first session, weíve invited three people to come and speak about archaeology, the science of digging up the past and uncovering the layers of history that tell us about our ancestors and how they lived. Pam Bain, from the Department of Conservation, and Anne McGuire, Aitanga-a-Hauiti Excavation Management Committee, will talk about the recent excavation at Cookís Cove, and local historian Sheila Robinson will tell us about the events of 1769 that help to make it an important site. How is the past uncovered, and what implications does it hold for us in the present?

Bone Lure Point

14th century

Z10482

L 2008.75

This lure point was excavated by archaeologists in 2007 from Cookís Cove. It is made of moa bone and would have been attached to a wooden or bone lure shank. Trolling lures were used for catching surface fish like kahawai and barracouta. The hole at the base of the lure point is to hold the harakeke (flax) thread which binds  the point to the lure shank.

The number Z10482 was assigned to this fish-hook by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage. The Protected Objects Act 1975 requires all taonga tŻturu (M‚ori artefacts) to be reported to the Ministry within 28 days of being found. This also applies to taonga tuturu found during archaeological excavations. The Ministry then consults with the tangata whenua, the local iwi (tribe) or hapu (subtribe) to determine who the customary kaitiaki (guardians) are. Te Aitanga-a-Hauiti of Tolaga Bay have been recognised as tangata whenua at Cook's Cove and they are the kaitiaki of the taonga tŻturu recovered from the Cook's Cove excavation.

 

 

 

Toki - Adze Head, Side Hafted

1988.103

This is a side-hafted toki that functioned as an axe rather than an adze. Side hafted adzes are very rare in the North Island and are known to be from the early period of M‚ori settlement, since the same kinds of adze were also made in Eastern Polynesia. This adze head is made of basalt extracted from a quarry at Tahanga in the Coromandel region of the North Island. It was found on Waihina Station at Muriwai, 20 kilometres south of Gisborne.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What: Watersheds: important moments in Tair‚whiti history

When: 5.30pm, Wednesday 15 July 2009

Where: Tair‚whiti Museum

In our second session, three local historians join us for a discussion about significant watersheds in the history of this region. From the first meeting of M‚ori and P‚keh‚, to the spread of Christianity, to the development of industry and economic infrastructure, Sheila Robinson, Monty Soutar and Sheridan Gundry will talk about specific moments in the past that changed the present.

Wool Press

early 20th century

wood

1971.237

This pocket wool press (so-called because of its small size) was used on remote high-country stations. Being small, it produced wool bales that could be conveniently transported on horseback along the narrow and winding trails from inland farms to the coast.

Descendants of A. H. Wallis have suggested that this wool press is of the same design as one he invented and used on his sheep station at Horehore.

 

 

Bill Beatty

Horehore Packing Track

December 1931

421-32

 

 

 

 

 

 

What: ĎPacific Art Niu Silaí: thinking about Pacific art in Aotearoa

When: 5.30pm, Tuesday 21 July 2009

Where: Tair‚whiti Museum

We are also privileged to have Sean Mallon, Curator of History, Pacific from Te Papa come and talk about Pacific art in Aotearoa. Sean will discuss how Te Papa and other institutions are tackling the complex stories of Pacific peoples, and dealing with the diversity of Pacific art and culture.

Winter Series 2009            download pdf Winter Series Media Release Click to Download Reader

with Damian Skinner

The Friends of the Tairawhiti Museum are following up the very successful series of events held last year with a new programme of talks over the winter months of 2009. Join us for your opportunity to get up close with the treasures of the Tairawhiti Museum, and to learn more about the wide world of art and culture that your local museum represents.

Over the coming months you will have the opportunity to tour the museumís changing series of exhibitions, and hear a wide range of local and visiting speakers. From the value of bad art, to the challenges of teaching art, from the many forms of contemporary Pacific art, to the role of ornament in local architecture, the Winter Series 2009 is guaranteed to generate just the right amount of cultural heat and light to keep you warm as the days grow colder and shorter.

                   
                    NORMAN SCOTT - Alan Barns-Graham

What: Whatís Good About Bad Art?

When: 5.30pm, Wednesday 13 May 2009

Where: Tairawhiti Museum

Take a tour with Damian Skinner through the underbelly of fine art, from the plush world of velvet painting to the scenery of calendar and chocolate box landscapes. Rightfully dismissed or unjustly maligned? Whatever you believe, Whatís Good About Bad Art? suggests thereís some surprising things to be discovered in the borderlands of the art world.

What: Artistís Choice: The Tairawhiti Museum Art Collection

When: 1.30pm, Saturday 23 May 2009

Where: Tairawhiti Museum

               
                CORNFIELD - Phylis Underdown

Join us for a tour of the Gisborne Art Societyís exhibition, followed by an opportunity to hear art society members Norman Maclean, Phyllis Underdown, Graeme Mudge and Kath Mclaughlin talk about their favourite works from the Tairawhiti Museumís collection.



Talking Textiles

The next public event being run by the Friends of the Tairawhiti Museum will be taking place on Sunday 19 October. Join Damian Skinner and a panel of experts as they explore the museumís textile collection. From the quirky and creative quilts that warmed a generation of Tairawhiti settlers in the late nineteenth century, to the stylish frocks that the best dressed citizens of Gisborne proudly wore in the early years of the twentieth century, this session will introduce you to the stories, technologies and aspirations captured in the stitched fabrics of the past.


Cost: Free to members of Creative Tairawhiti and Friends of the Museum, or $5 per talk for the general public. Gold coin admission for Students/Pace. Bookings are essential, call the museum, or email: lrattray@tairawhitimuseum.org.nz

Treasures of the Museum: The Legacy of the Lysnars
                      

We donít know the exact circumstances in which William Douglas Lysnar acquired this cameo brooch and earrings, probably for his wife, Ida Lysnar (nee Tiffen). It is possible that they were purchased overseas. Such items were often bought as souvenirs of the Grand Tour, in which wealthy tourists experienced the sights and cultures of Europe.

The classical style of these cameos, the flowing drapery and exquisite delicacy of the carving, suggests the artist was deliberately making references to the heritage of European art. Cameos themselves are an ancient form of relief carving, popular in both Greece and ancient Rome.

We know these cameos were set in 18 carat gold and surrounded with (surprisingly) simulated pearls at the beginning of the twentieth century. In tune with the sentimental Edwardian age, the back of the brooch has a compartment in which a lock of hair can be kept Ė a keepsake of a loved one.

They are a wonderful example of the cultural treasures that the Lysnar family collected and gifted to the people of Tairawhiti. Such objects represent the wealth of European culture and heritage that Pakeha settlers valued and incorporated into their lives Ė whether in the form of beautiful objects, as in these cameos, or through literature, music and the performing arts.

The story of the Tairawhiti Museum is closely connected to the Lysnar family. In 1954 Winifred Lysnar donated a house and the land on which it stood to the city of Gisborne, which became the first museum, run by the Gisborne Art Society. These links are celebrated in Allan Barns-Grahamís Portrait of Winifred Lysnar.

Barns-Graham, official war artist and art teacher at Gisborne Girls High, was a key figure in the establishment of the museum. This painting is more than a visual record of a great benefactor. It is also a record of the connections between individuals who made the present museum possible, the people who fostered cultural activities in our region.

                                     

The museum and its collections are one legacy of the Lysnar family. But their effect on Tairawhiti was much wider than simply being benefactors. W.D. Lysnar was a lawyer with a fearless reputation. His legal wig is a reminder of the foundation of his career, and his wealth, which quickly grew to include many business ventures Ė some successful, and some that proved too ambitious even for him. Among his other achievements he was mayor of Gisborne, and Member of Parliament for the Gisborne electorate for 12 years.



Terewhiti Rocks - Eric N. Gully

What: Apple for the Teacher

When: 5.30pm, Wednesday 10 June 2009

Where: Tair‚whiti Museum

The Friends have organised a discussion looking at the relationship between art teachers and their students. All around our city people study art every day. Come along and hear teachers and students from secondary and tertiary institutions and the Gisborne Art Society talk about what goes on in the art room.

What: The Acquisitive Eye: Private Collections in Tair‚whiti

When: 1.30pm, Saturday 20 June 2009

Where: Tair‚whiti Museum

Dice - Anneke Borren

Collectors are everywhere. One in four people actively collect something, which means that someone you know is, right now, involved in obsessively and passionately acquiring objects for their collection. In this session the Friends have invited three local collectors to speak about what they collect, how they got involved, and why they do this most human activity. Weíll also tour the museum exhibition Samples : Recent Acquisitions, which showcases some of the recent additions to the collection of the Tair‚whiti Museum.

Current series now on, click here for details.......


Creative Tairawhiti are delighted to be partnering with the Tairawhiti Museum to present the Damian Skinner Lecture Series.  The public are encouraged to come along to these talks and take advantage of some brilliant art resources. More information at
www.skinnerlectures.tairawhitiarts.net.

This series is funded with the support of Regional Strengths Maurangi Toi & CLANZ.